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News Highlights

September 30, 2017

UH CANCER CENTER ADDRESSES LUNG CANCER AT 7TH ANNUAL QUEST FOR A CURE

HONOLULU – The University of Hawai'i Cancer Center hosted its 7th Annual Quest for a Cure: Progress in Cancer Research event on September 30, 2017. The event highlighted the latest research and progress in lung cancer treatments and radiation therapy.

  • Lung & bronchus cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both sexes with an average of 526 deaths statewide each year.
  • Cancers of the lung & bronchus are the 2nd most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and women with an average of 776 new cases each year in Hawai'i.
  • Most lung & bronchus cancers are diagnosed at ages 55 and older.
  • In 2009-2013,15 percent of lung & bronchus cancers were diagnosed at early stages and 76 percent at late stages.

PROGRAM
Trends in Lung and Bronchus Cancer in Hawai'i
Brenda Hernandez, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Director, Hawai'i Tumor Registry, UH Cancer Center

Smoking and E-cigarette Use in Hawai'i: Where Have We Come From, Where Are We Going?
Thomas Wills, Ph.D.
Co-Leader, Population Science in the Pacific Program, UH Cancer Center

What I Think About When I Think About Lung Cancer
Ronald Yanagihara, M.D.
Medical Oncologist, Straub Clinic and Hospital

Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Past, Present, and Future
Richard Lee, M.D.
Radiation Oncologist, The Cancer Center of Hawai'i

Living Longer and Better: The Secret of Palliative Care
Daniel Fischberg, M.D.
Director, Pain and Palliative Care Department, The Queen's Medical Center

See photos from the event: http://owl.li/PEEu30fCujQ

The University of Hawai'i Cancer Center through its various activities, cancer trial patients and their guests, and other visitors adds more than $54 million to the O'ahu economy. It is one of only 69 research institutions designated by the National Cancer Institute. Affiliated with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, the Center is dedicated to eliminating cancer through research, education, patient care and community outreach with an emphasis on the unique ethnic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of Hawai'i and the Pacific.
Learn more at www.uhcancercenter.org. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UHCancerCenter. Follow us on Twitter @UHCancerCenter.

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News Highlights

August 16, 2017

Finding Potentially Improves Standard Mesothelioma Treatment

HONOLULU – University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers found that targeting chromosomal instability in mesothelioma, a very malignant cancer of the lining of the chest and abdomen often caused by asbestos, improves response to standard chemotherapies.

The study published in Oncogene found that a new drug known as CFI-402257 suppresses mesothelioma growth. The drug, synergized with the current standard of care for mesothelioma (Cisplatin/Pemetrexed therapy), reduced the growth of human mesothelioma cells thereby increasing the efficacy of the current standard of care. The preclinical findings indicated that CFI-402257 is a promising new therapeutic agent to improve current chemotherapeutic regimens for mesothelioma patients.

"We continue to search for weaknesses of mesothelioma cancer cells that can be exploited to improve current therapies for mesothelioma," said Dr. Haining Yang, senior author.

The research was coordinated and conducted in Hawai'i by Drs. Haining Yang and Michele Carbone at the UH Cancer Center, and in collaboration with the team of Dr. Tak Mak, at the University of Toronto.

Publication: Oncogene: Inhibition of the spindle assembly checkpoint kinase Mps-1 as a novel therapeutic strategy in malignant mesothelioma
DOI: 10.1038/onc.2017.266

The University of Hawai'i Cancer Center through its various activities, cancer trial patients and their guests, and other visitors adds more than $54 million to the O'ahu economy. It is one of only 69 research institutions designated by the National Cancer Institute. Affiliated with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, the Center is dedicated to eliminating cancer through research, education, patient care and community outreach with an emphasis on the unique ethnic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of Hawai'i and the Pacific.
Learn more at www.uhcancercenter.org. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UHCancerCenter. Follow us on Twitter @UHCancerCenter.

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News Highlights

September 21, 2017

UH CANCER CENTER ADDRESSES MOST COMMON CANCER IN MEN IN HAWAI'I AT 4th ANNUAL PROSTATE CANCER FORUM

HONOLULU – The University of Hawai'i Cancer Center hosted its 4th Annual Prostate Cancer Forum. The event is in recognition of National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. The forum featured local physicians who spoke about the latest prostate cancer treatments, breakthroughs and strategies.

The most common cancer in men in Hawai'i is prostate cancer, which accounts for 22 percent of cancer cases. Annually, an average of 743 men are diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer in Hawai'i, and an average of 99 men die of prostate cancer in the state each year.

Nearly all prostate cancers are diagnosed at ages 55 and older. Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in Hawai'i steadily declined over the past 20 years with the rate of new cancers falling nearly 5 percent per year over the past decade according to the Hawaii Tumor Registry of the UH Cancer Center.

To see photos: http://owl.li/d2l430fl0uV

The University of Hawai'i Cancer Center through its various activities, cancer trial patients and their guests, and other visitors adds more than $54 million to the O'ahu economy. It is one of only 69 research institutions designated by the National Cancer Institute. Affiliated with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, the Center is dedicated to eliminating cancer through research, education, patient care and community outreach with an emphasis on the unique ethnic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of Hawai'i and the Pacific.
Learn more at www.uhcancercenter.org. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UHCancerCenter. Follow us on Twitter @UHCancerCenter.

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News Highlights

July 28, 2017

STUDY FINDS HIGH-QUALITY DIET CAN REDUCE INTERNAL BODY FAT

HONOLULU – A long term healthy, high-quality diet can reduce the risk of cardiometabolic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or stroke according to a new University of Hawai'i Cancer Center Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) study.

A high-quality diet includes a diet high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes, with lean, low-fat protein sources plus, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods and oils, such as olive oil. An important component of a high-quality diet is limiting sodium (salt) intake, and empty calories from sugar and saturated and trans fat.

"The burden of chronic diseases related to obesity, such as diabetes and breast cancer, is high among many ethnic groups in Hawai'i. Therefore, it is important to study how diet may improve excess body weight and fatty liver. This may allow the development of better prevention strategies," said Gertraud Maskarinec, MD, PhD, first author and UH Cancer Center Cancer Epidemiology Program researcher.

The participants completed food frequency questionnaires from 1993 to 1996 and clinic visits in 2013 to 2016 and underwent whole-body and abdominal scans. Four science-based diet quality scores predicted lower visceral fat, excess body fat within the abdomen and the liver, and fatty liver. Of the 2,000 participants of the Multiethnic Cohort, more than half live in Hawai'i and Los Angeles.

Individuals with the highest diet quality scores were 35 to 59 percent less likely to have high visceral fat and were also 22 to 43 percent less likely to have fatty liver than those with the lowest scores.

"In recent years, the importance of body fat distribution has emerged. Visceral fat appears to be a stronger risk factor for chronic diseases than body fat located directly under the skin. The proportion of visceral fat appears to differ by ethnicity with higher levels among individuals of Japanese and other Asian ancestries than Whites," said Maskarinec. "The new findings suggest that body fat distribution beyond excess body weight is a critical feature to consider when advising individuals about the health effects of their regular diets."

Publication
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.21868/full
DOI: 10.1002/oby.21868

The University of Hawai'i Cancer Center through its various activities, cancer trial patients and their guests, and other visitors adds more than $54 million to the O'ahu economy. It is one of only 69 research institutions designated by the National Cancer Institute. Affiliated with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, the Center is dedicated to eliminating cancer through research, education, patient care and community outreach with an emphasis on the unique ethnic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of Hawai'i and the Pacific.
Learn more at www.uhcancercenter.org. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UHCancerCenter. Follow us on Twitter @UHCancerCenter.

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